Tell it like it is

Since publishing my last post on content strategy I saw this great opinion piece in The Drum. It argues that 'content' as a term is actually absurdly vague. It's use in a digital context is originated by website programmers as a term to describe the stuff that wasn't code.

As a quick shorthand term it has now snowballed and is used for pretty much everything we produce. Recording a video is content, taking a photo is content and even writing an email is content. I wholly agree with this argument that content as a term is far too generic and doesn't suggest that it is much fun to create let alone consume. Who wants to read some 'content' to their child at bedtime?!

When I used to work in a library I remember it being re-branded the Learning Resource Centre (LRC). This was to denote that it held more than books but it didn't stop everyone still calling it the library, as that's what it was...

It always works better when we call things what the actually are. It's time to start being specific again and talking about 'website copy', 'social media infographics' or 'short videos'. Content as a term does not do justice to the effort that goes in to creating the copy and imagery required for a new website. I wonder if I'll be brave enough to address this point at the 'Content Strategy Masterclass' which I'll be attending this week at the Design Museum?!

This argument opens up some other big issues for me with the jargon used in digital marketing. Most industries have people who look to impress by using the latest pretentious jargon - and if it doesn't exist already then they invent it! I've seen lots of examples at work of people using jargon or acronyms to try to look intellectually superior to others. There is no shame at all in asking what an acronym means.

The worst, and most prevalent, buzz phrase for me is 'thought leadership'. It's also become too broad a brushstroke for people who share their thoughts about trends and breakthroughs in their field, with a view to position themselves as authorities on a subject. It seems that many people are striving to be 'thought leaders' when only a handful of people on the planet can truly claim to have completely original ideas. After all there's a very good argument that original ideas and thought are a thing of the past and everything is a remix anyway.

In writing this blog the most I would say about myself is that I am a committed custodian of ideas, innovation, thinking and sharing. Even that sounds a bit like overstating it when I'm just trying to honestly share some anecdotes and real-life experiences from working in digital.

In my job I frequently switch between either an unhealthy overwhelming self belief or the feeling that I'm an impostor who is going to get found out! There's a chance the latter is true but the self-respecting part of me wants to challenge that notion.

As with most of us, when I get stuck on a task or am looking for recommendations for tools/resources/strategies/solutions, I often ask my network for help. This usually works and I get lots of really useful help but some come with the disappointing prefix of one word 'Just...'

Just use this software/platform/toolkit/methodology…”

“Just” makes me feel like an imposter. “Just” presumes I come from a specific background, studied certain courses in university, am fluent in certain technologies, and have read all the right books, articles, and resources. “Just” is a dangerous word.

My wife regularly uses it when explaining her profession - 'I'm just a stay at home Mum'. I tell her off for this all the time as it massively underplays the work she does. She works longer hours and a lot harder than me!

The amount of available knowledge in our field (or any field really) is growing larger and more complex all the time. That everyone has accessed the same fundamental knowledge on any topic is becoming less and less probable. We have to be careful not to make too many assumptions and undermine people who have a real willingness to learn. There are some great resources out there to help.
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