Since publishing my last post on content strategy I saw this great opinion piece in The Drum. It argues that 'content' as a term is actually absurdly vague. It's use in a digital context is originated by website programmers as a term to describe the stuff that wasn't code.

As a quick shorthand term it has now snowballed and is used for pretty much everything we produce. Recording a video is content, taking a photo is content and even writing an email is content. I wholly agree with this argument that content as a term is far too generic and doesn't suggest that it is much fun to create let alone consume. Who wants to read some 'content' to their child at bedtime?!

When I used to work in a library I remember it being re-branded the Learning Resource Centre (LRC). This was to denote that it held more than books but it didn't stop everyone still calling it the library, as that's what it was...

It always works better when we call things what the actually are. It's time to start being specific again and talking about 'website copy', 'social media infographics' or 'short videos'. Content as a term does not do justice to the effort that goes in to creating the copy and imagery required for a new website. I wonder if I'll be brave enough to address this point at the 'Content Strategy Masterclass' which I'll be attending this week at the Design Museum?!

This argument opens up some other big issues for me with the jargon used in digital marketing. Most industries have people who look to impress by using the latest pretentious jargon - and if it doesn't exist already then they invent it! I've seen lots of examples at work of people using jargon or acronyms to try to look intellectually superior to others. There is no shame at all in asking what an acronym means.

The worst, and most prevalent, buzz phrase for me is 'thought leadership'. It's also become too broad a brushstroke for people who share their thoughts about trends and breakthroughs in their field, with a view to position themselves as authorities on a subject. It seems that many people are striving to be 'thought leaders' when only a handful of people on the planet can truly claim to have completely original ideas. After all there's a very good argument that original ideas and thought are a thing of the past and everything is a remix anyway.

In writing this blog the most I would say about myself is that I am a committed custodian of ideas, innovation, thinking and sharing. Even that sounds a bit like overstating it when I'm just trying to honestly share some anecdotes and real-life experiences from working in digital.

In my job I frequently switch between either an unhealthy overwhelming self belief or the feeling that I'm an impostor who is going to get found out! There's a chance the latter is true but the self-respecting part of me wants to challenge that notion.

As with most of us, when I get stuck on a task or am looking for recommendations for tools/resources/strategies/solutions, I often ask my network for help. This usually works and I get lots of really useful help but some come with the disappointing prefix of one word 'Just...'

Just use this software/platform/toolkit/methodology…”

“Just” makes me feel like an imposter. “Just” presumes I come from a specific background, studied certain courses in university, am fluent in certain technologies, and have read all the right books, articles, and resources. “Just” is a dangerous word.

My wife regularly uses it when explaining her profession - 'I'm just a stay at home Mum'. I tell her off for this all the time as it massively underplays the work she does. She works longer hours and a lot harder than me!

The amount of available knowledge in our field (or any field really) is growing larger and more complex all the time. That everyone has accessed the same fundamental knowledge on any topic is becoming less and less probable. We have to be careful not to make too many assumptions and undermine people who have a real willingness to learn. There are some great resources out there to help.
Every marketer talks about the importance of content. I believe that it's the most important (and hardest) part of any project. But what does good content look like and how is it generated?

As we're now deep into the development of our new website I thought I'd share the method we've been using for business orientated outcomes. The main aim, as always, is to be as useful as possible to any future visitor.

By using the core content model (devised by someone far cleverer than me and introduced to us by our web agency) we begin by auditing the content we have. This involves cross referencing our top 20% search engine ranked pages with our top 20% visited pages. By doing this we identify what content we need to keep before rewriting it.

We pick out the keywords for each of these pages which we need to keep for SEO purposes being sure to keep the user in mind at all times. For example, visitors to our 'About Us' page will have clear questions in mind such as 'Can I work with these people?' 'Why are they better than the last 5 companies I've looked at?' By answering these user questions in a conversational (i.e. no jargon) way it's much easier to show the personality of our brand. We've even tried recorded interviews with colleagues answering these questions to ensure the writing style is more personable.

Next we need to involve our editorial council to generate the new content. To do this we've created a helpsheet which identifies the cores. Each representative of the business first lists their 'Business Goals' and 'User Tasks' for their proposed page. For example, these could be 'To help increase knowledge of BIM' and 'To see projects utilising BIM'.

An example of our new content template
Then we ask them to plan the inward paths to this page (i.e. how will users find it). These could be 'By Googling BIM' or 'By clicking on a homepage link'.

After this they need to determine the core content. To do this they need to think about what content is needed for the user to achieve their goals. The format of this can be defined as anything from either text, video, an infographic or a quiz.

Finally, they need to set the forward paths - where does the visitor go next? This could be either looking at other modern building techniques or getting in touch to find out more.

By looking at everything in tandem with a well researched list of keywords, and in the context of tasks, all content will be written with the user in mind. It also means that editors are forced to think about the real business case for everything that is published on the website. This process ensures nothing is published on a whim but that the purpose of each webpage is clearly documented.

We've started using the excellent tool 'Gather Content' to collect what we need from the business in the correct format. We can set module types for consistency along with character and word limits. Editors fill in the form and it is all ready to populate the CMS via the existing integrations. I've found tools like this (which allow us to work on project tasks in tandem) are essential when on a tight schedule!

Whilst I'm on the subject of content I spent last Friday at interviews for the CIPR Excellence Awards where our Shaping Your World campaign is shortlisted for 'Best Use of Content'. This was a great experience and we discover if we've won for either this or Best B2B Campaign (for which we're also shortlisted) on 6th June.

We've also achieved another ambition by being shortlisted for the Best Integrated B2B Campaign at the Drum Marketing Awards. This is for the same campaign and is a massive achievement given we're up against companies list Spotify and Dropbox! The awards for this are the previous Wednesday, 30th May, so it should be a great fortnight of celebrations.
Something is wrong with social media. It's been widely publicised this week that the backlash is in full swing. This ongoing debate is not going to go away any time soon. I'm sure we've all experienced that world weary feeling whilst scrolling through our newfeed. For many of us it may be increasingly attractive to not engage at all. I try to limit most of my social use for professional purposes. But this means I am still complicit despite my Facebook account being a neglected place with no real reason to even exist.

One of my main proactive interventions is a refusal to let my children watch YouTube videos unsupervised. My fear being that they're just one 'recommended video' away from something potentially harmful.

The new Samsung Galaxy J2 Pro
This weekend Samsung announced their new J2 Pro Smartphone. It's main feature is that mobile data is totally blocked, including 3G and Wi-Fi. This device is being targeted at students who don't want to worry about data charges and need to focus on their studies. It's definitely an attractive option for me as my eldest approaches secondary school age!

For over 10 years people have shared the most intimate parts of their digital life. It is only now that they acknowledge feeding profit-maximizing surveillance machines. But Facebook can’t stop monetizing this personal data for the same reason that Costa can’t stop selling coffee - it’s the heart of their enterprise.

So why has it taken this long for people to get smart to this? For me the main reason is that people didn't want to hear it. The benefits were too alluring, enjoyable and empowering. A large proportion of the population are dealing with an addiction. So as with all addictive substances people become self destructive and continue regardless.

The instant gratification of social media use is prioritised over finding ways to make it less intrusive and exploitative. Recently we've seen many governments and organisations attempting to control this through policy. The cookie law was a distant failed attempt to be more responsible about data collection. I remember the panic we had to get this implemented on an old website! And now we have GDPR on the horizon <groan...>

But these efforts don’t touch the underlying problems, and in fact could make it harder for start-ups to compete with large corporates.

To really change the way the social media works the most effective route would be to take a genuinely moralistic outlook. If the moral compass of each organisation was clearly defined from the outset it would help prevent illicit behaviour. The argument being that in a cut-throat world you must join them in order to beat them. 

What starts out as a campaign to increase sales can soon take a dark turn as more aggressive methods are employed. We've all seen tactics such as re-targeting, click bait or the massaging of analytics data being employed. If all companies, and individuals, begin with a clear manifesto to control and define their behaviour these practices would cease. 

The original dream of social media was to produce healthy discussions, to unlock new forms of creativity, and to connect people to others with similar interests. This still happens in many circles and needs to be championed. 
Spring has sprung!

Social networks could, for example, give their users an automatic 'self-cleaning' option. This which would regularly clear their profiles of apps they no longer used, friends and followers they no longer interacted with, and data they no longer needed to store. If these tools were enabled, users would need to take action if they didn’t want their information to disappear after a certain number period. 

This would mean social graphs are temporary, rather than preserving them forever by default. It would undoubtedly be bad for most social networks’ business models. But it could create new and healthy norms around privacy and data hygiene, and it would keep problems from piling up as networks get older and more crowded. It might even recapture some of the magic of the original social networks, when things were fresh and fascinating, and not quite so scary. 

The subtitle of this blog has always been 'Digital Marketing with Morals'. This is something I constantly strive for despite often falling sadly short.
The most important way to run a new website project is to engage directly with end users and the goals of the business. By talking to people in person the insight gained is invaluable. However, this can definitely be complimented by a decent amount of desk research.

Over the last few weeks we've been pulling together all the data sources at our disposal to get a full picture of our current users. We also have a lot of extra information around key clients and opportunities in our increasingly powerful CRM (Customer Relationship Management).

Social media

One task which we're looking at is an overview of our current social media channels. This isn't a full review of their effectiveness to define the strategy, but more taking stock of where we currently are. After all, I have to have a project to keep me busy once the website is live! I'm looking at:
  • The most shared content from us and our competitors
  • Phraseology to determine discipline around industry language
  • Positive and negative sentiment to inform the content strategy and customer service focus 
This will give us a good insight into how our current channels and the terminology used on the website will work together.

Existing site map

It's important to have this logged before work begins! A nice free tool for doing this to GlooMaps. It has all the sharing and export options you could possibly need and is really user friendly.

Contact us form

Our current form pipes queries through to the relevant part of the business based on the enquiry type. This means we can export a full report of all submissions from 2017-18. By mapping them to different parts of the business we can identify how this important section will take shape on the new website.

Internal search terms

We're pulling together a years' worth of search terms and am organising them by key themes. For example, those related to job searches. This informs the weighting of content for the new site and identifies specific times when certain content is more popular for the content strategy.

Referral terms

For this we're using SEMRush which is an extremely powerful SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) suite. This allows us to determine how users have found our website and the terms used. Rather than using Google Analytics data it has the added bonus of giving us a comparative positioning map. This identifies competitors and shows the strengths and weaknesses of their domains' presence in organic search results.

Branded traffic

SEMrush's split of branded vs. unbranded traffic is a really interesting metric for us. It identifies the 'best in class' competitor websites who have traffic we could gain by increasing our own ranking for non-branded keywords.

Keyword opportunities

Whilst SEMrush has a massive amount of data on the opportunities available we've been complimenting this with WordStream. Their free keyword tool shows search volume, competition and opportunity score. Structural/civil engineer have been identified as some of the terms we need to definitely rank for in the future!

Business insight

The challenge here is to first decide on what will be useful to inform the content strategy. To begin, We're identifying key clients by region and looking at separate HR job search data. CRM is essential in showing us how we currently map sectors and for identifying the stages of our current bid processes.

These are just some of the ways we're pulling together our current data. The key is ensuring everything we have gives us actionable insight. Ultimately, we want an informed content strategy for our new website which puts the user's needs first.

I'm already learning so much about the business, our online community and our competitors. This should mean that maintaining the website becomes a much easier, more strategic task post launch!
Our physical Pinterest board
It's been a week of getting away from our desks and spending our time sticking things on walls!

One discussion point, which came up at a recent team meeting, was the importance of sharing best practice internally. Whether it be in person, on email or via Yammer all of us in Marcomms have something to share with each other. So, to take this a step further, I took it upon myself to create a real-life Pinterest board next to my desk!

After a little bit of whiteboard pen calligraphy it was good to go (I may have spent too long on this bit!) The idea is that the team can now pin up any great examples of Marketing, PR and Internal Communications that inspire them. It's already looking great, and has become an office talking point, with loads of fun contributions from the whole team.

On a more serious note, and to begin the discovery phase of our new website, this week I ran an away day in Solihull with colleagues from Kier construction.

The objectives for this session were to gather true internal business insight. We wanted to look at how we win and retain business and 'our perception of how we are perceived' by clients. This exercise will of course be mandated by taking the opposite approach from the outside in (i.e from a client's point of view). But by starting with our people it eased us in to collecting a great deal of useful data.

As our construction business operates very regionally we expected a nuanced view from all involved. For example, some are working on very different types of job depending on the geography. 

Representatives from each of these 7 regions were given different coloured post it notes to differentiate them. We then asked them to write on separate notes the sectors in which they operate (i.e. education). They then placed these on the wall in two separate columns labeled as 'maintain' or 'grow'. The instruction was to place them lower on the wall if the opportunity was less and higher if it was more. So if there is a low ambition to grow in that sector it should be nearer the bottom. Similarly, a high ambition to maintain in a sector means the note should be nearer the top of that column.

This allowed us to see the synergies between the targets of different regions at a glance. It also gave us an idea of how they classify each client for whom they build. We ensured we took lots of photos throughout the day so we could write up the notes later.

The next step was to create new columns on the wall for each individual sector (x-axis). For each of these we then created sub headings horizontally (y-axis). These included key clients, capabilities, unique selling points and keywords. By working through each one individually we compiled a powerful list to inform the weighting of our web content. I think that without running a 'post it notes on the wall' exercise like this you can't say you're a proper digital marketer! Perhaps I took my passion for Trello a bit far by recreating it in real life...

To finish I gave a short presentation on our current Google ranking for certain keywords versus our competitors. This highlighted missed opportunities and showed how we will use all the data we just collected.

Days like this are essential to gain a real understanding of the business. Whilst it will be the first of many it energised me into looking at this project from the point of view of how the business thinks and talks. Most importantly it will give our website users what they want in terms of the content weighting and language.

In my next post I'll discuss some desk based methods for gathering this type of intelligence which I'm currently undertaking. By the end of this process I'll be so buried in data that the formality of building the website will be easy (or not!)
Writing this blog every other Monday can sometimes be a challenge. I settle on a subject, start doing some research and then end up in an internet wormhole. Then I need to refocus and remember what my original idea was!

It's less of a case of not knowing when to switch off and focus on real life but instead about trying to stay productive. The fear of missing out is a really big factor in this. The constantly humming news streams of social media or the news alerts from the BBC all try to pull me away from the task I'm trying to complete.

In a normal workday there are always distractions either from Skype, the mobile or the dreaded email. For the last week I've spent a lot of the time writing either agency briefs, award entries or funding submissions. For me, one of the things I like most about digital marketing is how varied it is. By just carrying out the same type of task (especially one that doesn't come naturally) it has been difficult to keep focused on delivery. So I've recently been thinking about methods I've previously employed to achieve this.

Firstly, I make sure that my emails are off! By getting started straight away before I get sucked into the game of email tennis it helps to set up my day as I mean to go on. That way I avoid getting to Friday and having to power work my way through all of the tasks that I need to complete.

With the type of work that many digital jobs entail it can also help to step away from and look at it with fresh eyes. I've found this in the past with video editing that sometimes you can get so embroiled you don't know if what you're looking at is any good anymore! This time off is not stalled productivity but is an investment in future performance. It does mean not leaving tasks to the last minute though!

My work setup is that I have two computer screens and this is something which I find super valuable. Typing on one screen while looking at a reference on the other or looking at my calendar on one screen and having my email on another really works even though it seems so simple. When I go home and try to use my laptop after using my two screens at work, I am noticeably slower at what I am trying to accomplish. Especially copying and pasting between documents.

Also, having a large family means we all have evening commitments. Whether it's tutoring, kickboxing, beavers/cubs or swimming it's important I leave on time most days. By having these commitments to ensure a definite leaving time each day, there's a healthy internal pressure to get things done. I've found in the past that not having a definite leaving time makes me more lax, thinking I have 24 hours until the next business day dawns. Then at 5.30pm I always update and prioritise my to-do list for tomorrow. That helps me come in and get going right away whilst also not worrying about what I need to do out of hours. My past self has it all taken care of!

I'm also a people person so for me I ensure I make time to chat with workmates or maybe help them with something. This is important time away from the screen and researching this blog helps me to try to stay ahead of the curve.

So I've hit my deadlines, I've submitted the awards entry and I've secured the funding. Now I need the same discipline to not multi-task on different devices? With an upcoming kitchen extension I'm going to enjoy all of my spare time being dominated by decorating in contrast to a day looking at the screen...!
After six years of blogging about digital marketing I've only ever fleetingly mentioned SEO (Search Engine Optimisation). Obviously, it's an essential part of any website build and beyond and cannot be ignored. I think the main reason for not mentioning it is that I've always found it tough to reconcile myself with it morally. It's been this sort of necessary evil which I've had to begrudgingly spend time administering.

The reason for this is that in the old days the internet was a mass of weird publishing. Everybody was working out the rules and the etiquette. There weren't the billions of pages we have now so there were always those that could 'play the system' to appear higher in the search results.

Some of the underhand tactics that were used were things like putting white text in the background of a page. This meant search engines would see them but visitors could not thus pushing the website up the rankings. There was also the practice of 'keyword stuffing'. Keywords are words people were using to search for content – and keyword stuffing means putting them all over the page. This did not make for a good user experience as every other word being a keyword meant they barely made sense!

But then search engines got more intelligent. Google, for example is now looking to serve relevant content. If the content it links the visitor to is bad or irrelevant they'll find another, more reliable, search engine to use. Quite rightly Google has penalised any websites using these dark practices for some time now.

So why I have I finally found an interest in writing a post about SEO? It's because for me SEO has now evolved so much that it's not even about 'SEARCH ENGINE optimisation' anymore, but 'USER optimisation'. By putting the user's needs first SEO is no longer a trick that is deployed at the end of a process. It's now simply about publishing good content people like.

By writing in the same way that an audience searches (www.google.co.uk/trends/explore is a good tool for this) your website is more likely to be found. This also means that once it has been found the content is relevant to the search, and you haven't tricked someone to get them there.

You can add all the metadata and SEO tricks in the book. But not only will you have trouble in your conscience you'll also come second best to those with unique content. Writing unique content will prioritise pages on Google instead of mixing you up with your competitors. Spend your time on what your company can really offer and on showing how you differentiate. By doing this the chances are that other websites are more likely to link to you showing Google how trustworthy you are. 

Accessibility is as important to high rankings and I've recently been presenting a lot on this subject. I could write a separate post on this alone! Again, the approach is not to treat it as a tick box exercise but to make your content so inclusive it appeals to everyone. We are all capable of being distracted, in a rush or otherwise engaged. This means we may read a page in a way like those with dyslexia or who do not speak English as a first language. Bearing this in mind when writing makes it better for everybody and ultimately leads to a better website.

Recently we've been very excited to see our Shaping Your World website hit page one of Google for certain search terms. This is no accident as we've been careful to structure the content based on mental models. By making the journey clear as they navigate through the pages users get an idea of what to expect.

So my message is don't try to trick the system - it's not worth your time. Write to your audience. Write to what they want from you in the language they use, using a structure that is intuitive for them and you’ll get SEO as a freebie without even trying.
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